Education Program

Translational Science 2017 offers in-depth concurrent sessions for all levels of experience, grouped into the following tracks. Click on any track name to see the sessions being offered, and check back soon for additional updates!

Career Dev.png        CR Forum.png        Education.png
         
Health Equity.png        Patient Centered.png        Regulatory.png
         
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Career Development

Approaches to Integrate Data Science Methods and Skills into Translational Science Training Programs
Presented by Erica Rosemond, National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, NIH; Justin Starren, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

There is an increasing focus on the development and application of new methods to extract meaning from the massive and diverse sources of biomedical data.  This session will focus on describing current biomedical data science training priority areas and initiatives, as well as approaches to develop data science training programs for translational researchers.   

Deconstructing and Reconstructing the Definition of Career Success from Traditional Models
Presented by Theresa O'Brien, PhD, University of California, San Francisco; Frederick J. Meyers, MD, MACP, University of California, Davis

Scientists are familiar with a traditional model of career success: namely, the progression towards a tenure-track faculty position. However, nearly 80% of scientific trainees end up in other positions such as industry or non-tenure-track positions. This session aims to uncover ways to highlight these important and valuable pathways. Using case examples and data, two experts in mentoring and career development will provide alternative descriptions of career success.

Designing Successful Online Programs: Goals, Challenges, Lessons Learned
Presented by Marie Norman, University of Pittsburgh; Nicole Masen, Northwestern University; Emma Benn, Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai

In this session, we will explore different models of online course and program development. Each presenter will outline the goals, approach, challenges, outcomes, and lessons learned of a different online course development project. Participants will see a range of examples and leave with practical tools and tips they can use in the development of their own online curricula.

How to be an Effective Mentee
Presented by Christine Sorkness, University of Wisconsin; Emma Meagher, University of Pennsylvania

This session will build on the extensive experience at the University of Wisconsin designing and implementing novel approaches to building skills of mentors and mentees.  In particular, it will demonstrate a portion of the curriculum designed for K Scholars. An interactive format will highlight the importance of and approaches to effective communications and aligning expectations within mentoring relationships.  The activities will emphasize how trainees can both take responsibility for and become skilled at guiding these relationships rather than waiting for mentors to take the lead.

How to Write a Successful Career Development (K) Award
Presented by Ellen W. Seely, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School; Marie Gelato, MD PhD Stonybrook Medical Center

This interactive session will provide you with helpful strategies in writing and obtaining a mentored K award.  We will discuss the different types of K, how to know which one to apply for, how to decipher what the NIH is really asking for in each section, how to write a career development plan and how to choose a mentor.  We will also discuss how to revise a resubmission if your grant is not funded on the first submission. We will then break into small groups to answers to be able to provide individualized feedback.

How to Write an F Award
Presented by Patricia J. Simpson Haidaris, PhD, University of Rochester Medical Center

The latest versions of the F-award mechanism will be discussed with many tips on how to be successful.

Individual Career Development Plans for Clinical and Translational Trainees: Platforms, Implementation, and Evaluation
Presented by Cecilia Patino Sutton, University of Southern California; Janice Gabrilove, Mount Sinai Icahn School of Medicine

Mythbusting: K to Independence
Presented by Frederick J. Meyers, MD, MACP, University of California, Davis; Kim Bogess, MD, University of North Carolina

The transition from mentored awards to independence is an exciting but often uncertain period. Mentored scientists are not often given clear direction and expectations during their awards. Two leaders in career development discuss milestones, myths, and the different pathways mentored scientists can take to achieve success.

Novel Approaches to Successful Grant Writing
Presented by Rick McGee, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

This session will introduce a novel way for teaching and learning the skill of writing NIH-style research proposals.  It will draw on a method developed and used over the past decade, focusing on learning and writing to rhetorical patterns.  It will also demonstrate in real time the use of oral feedback processes with mentors and peers to replicate how reviewers read and evaluate proposals.  These methods have been shown to be effective by the presenter and are being expanded nationally through the NIH-funded National Research Mentoring Network (NRMN).

Novel Definitions of Career Success in Clinical and Translational Research
Presented by Vicki Ellingrod, Pharm.D., College of Pharmacy, University of Michigan; Anthony Windebank, MD, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science

The panelist will present new career pathways for individuals trained in clinical and translational research.  Successful careers outside of the traditional, extramurally funded principal investigator are emerging across the spectrum of translational science.  The panelists will encourage audience participation with career planning or mentoring scenarios.

Serendipity in Science
Presented by Kevin Deane, MD, University of Colorado Denver; Barry S. Coller, MD Rockefeller University

Serendipity in Science showcases the careers and accomplishments of exceptional scientists. Through tales of success, sometimes failure, and occasional luck, listeners will glean precious advice from the wisdom these scientists have accumulated. The result is a fun session that inspires junior as well as senior scientists alike.

Scholar Networking Meeting with Federal Training Partners
The networking session is designed to provide an opportunity for training attendees to meet with program officials from several federal funding agencies including the National Institutes of Health, Food and Drug Administration, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, and the Veterans Administration. Agency representatives will be in attendance to exchange ideas, advice and funding information about research projects and grant solicitations. Officials include:

  • Ericka M. Boone, PhD, Director, Loan Repayment Program, Office of Extramural Programs (OEP), Office of Extramural Research (OER), National Institutes of Health (NIH) 
  • Diane Bild, MD, MPH, Senior Program Officer, Clinical Effectiveness Research Program, Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) 
  • Kishena Wadhwani, PhD MPH, Director, Division of Scientific Review, Office of Extramural Research, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) 
  • Yolanda Mock Hawkins, PhD, MBA, Technology Transfer Specialist, Center For Drug Evaluation and Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 
  • Monica Lypson, MD, MHPE, Director of Medical and Dental Education, Office of Academic Affiliations, Veterans Health Administration, Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) 

Systematic Approaches to Mentoring
Presented by Anthony Windebank, MD, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science; Kenzie Cameron, PhD, MPH, FAACH, Northwestern University; Heather Billings, PhD, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science

Mentorship Is critically important but often happens by chance.  The speakers will present for discussion several different approaches to developing systematic mentorship programs. These will include programs for junior faculty and MD, PhD or MD-PhD students.  The programs have been initiated at the departmental and at the school level.  The structure of the programs and the methodology will be briefly presented and audience participation and discussion will be welcomed.

CR Forum Sessions

Broadly Engaged Team Science: Guidelines for Research Institutions for Stakeholder Engagement
Presented by Consuelo H. Wilkins, Meharry-Vanderbilt Alliance; Joe V. Selby Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute

It is increasingly apparent that true team science not only requires the active participation of a range of disciplines and roles, but to be relevant and impactful, these teams must include stakeholders from outside the academic research enterprise, such as patients, communities, and not-for- and for-profit organizations.  We term this “broadly engaged team science.”  This session will address how, in our research institutions, we promote clinical research processes with a proposed model of broadly engaged team science.  An objective of this session will be to generate a list of recommendations and steps that could be useful to the national clinical research enterprise around stakeholder engagement as broadly engaged team science.

Clinical Research Forum Top 10 Awardee Presentations

The Clinical Research Forum Top 10 Clinical Research Awards honor scientific teams that published groundbreaking clinical and translational studies during the past year. Three of the Top 10 awardees will present their research project, discuss their findings, and the implications of the project for benefiting the health of the public and for advancing translational research methods.

Integrating Clinical and Translational Research into Clinical Care
Presented by Jeanhee A. Chung, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital; Dan Roden, Vanderblilt School of Medicine

This session will focus on performing clinical and translational research in the setting of clinical care. The session will focus on the digital divide between clinical researchers and clinicians, approaches to overcome the divide and potential areas for collaboration (e.g., recruitment, data sharing, etc.). The session will also focus on return of genetic data to the electronic medical record and its use for clinical care and research.

Education

Biostatistical Education to Increase Research Innovation and Diversity in Academic Medicine
Presented by Emilia Bagiella, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai; Melissa D. Begg, Columbia University

Increasing recruitment, retention, promotion, and research innovation of diverse leaders in the clinical investigator workforce, inclusive of both clinicians and non-clinicians, requires comprehensive, multilevel solutions. One mechanism by which academic medical institutions can better ensure the success of underrepresented minorities (URMs) is by providing them with unique opportunities to simultaneously increase their statistical competency and research capacity. In this panel discussion, two leaders in the field of biostatistics, who have extensive experience in the development and implementation of methodological training programs targeted to URMs at various stages in their careers will share their experiences with regards to the development, implementation, and evaluation of such programs.

Designing Successful Online Programs: Goals, Challenges, Lessons Learned
Presented by Marie Norman, University of Pittsburgh; Nicole Masen, Northwestern University; Emma Benn, Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai

In this session, we will explore different models of online course and program development. Each presenter will outline the goals, approach, challenges, outcomes, and lessons learned of a different online course development project. Participants will see a range of examples and leave with practical tools and tips they can use in the development of their own online curricula.

Education Administrators Networking Session

This session will provide an opportunity for non-faculty education and career development administrators to share best practices, develop creative solutions, and mentor one another. This session will consist of simultaneous round-table discussions on several topics: curriculum sharing & online resources, best practices for scholar/trainee tracking, mentoring, and evaluation. Participants will rotate among table topics.   Facilitators include:

  • Jennifer McKanry, Washington University in St. Louis 
  • Jeanne Dzekov McKean, University of Southern California
  • Rachel Bastian, University of Pennsylvania 
  • Rachel Driskell, Washington University in St. Louis 
  • Rachel Lamp, Washington University in St. Louis

Individual Career Development Plans for Clinical and Translational Trainees: Platforms, Implementation, and Evaluation
Presented by Cecilia Patino Sutton, University of Southern California; Janice Gabrilove, Mount Sinai Icahn School of Medicine

Individual Development Plans (IDPs) are tools used to guide career development across diverse disciplines and recommended by NIH for all federally funded training programs. The IDP process involves defining career development goals that will be achieved within pre-specified timelines and consequently using the IDP as a means to monitor and evaluate successful career progression. In this session we will describe examples of how IDPs are implemented within the CTSA Training Programs and propose a framework to evaluate their effectiveness as a career development tool. We will the use an open session forum discussion to help this field move forward with the overall goal of improving processes used to advance careers of clinical and translational researchers.

Innovative Products for Curriculum Design
Presented by Susan Murphy, The University of Michigan; James Willig University of Alabama-Birmingham

This session will present two different products and approaches that can be used to design a program or curriculum for clinical research trainees, or incorporate tools--such as gamification--to enhance learner engagement. The panel and audience discussion should provide opportunities to apply lessons from these approaches to a range of education and training settings.  

Mythbusting: K to Independence
Presented by Frederick J. Meyers, MD, MACP, University of California, Davis; Kim Bogess, MD, University of North Carolina

The transition from mentored awards to independence is an exciting but often uncertain period. Mentored scientists are not often given clear direction and expectations during their awards. Two leaders in career development discuss milestones, myths, and the different pathways mentored scientists can take to achieve success.

Partnerships to Advance Training in Translational and Regulatory Science
Presented by ShaAvhrée Buckman-Garner, Food and Drug Administration; Robert J. Meyer, University of Virginia

Regulatory Science is often defined as the science of developing new tools, standards, and approaches to assess the safety, efficacy, quality, and performance of regulated products.  Translational Science and Regulatory Science have a shared goal and promise to advance medical product development and ultimately improve public health.  Progress in this area requires collaborative multi-disciplinary training approaches that engage diverse partners.  This session will explore training needs, initiatives and career pathways that integrate translational science and regulatory science, including the role for partnerships between academia, industry and government.   

Research on a Napkin: Feedback on Design and Statistical Issues
Presented by Felicity Enders, PhD, MPH, Mayo Clinic; Emma K. Benn, DrPH, MPH, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai; Richard Holubkov, PhD, University of Utah School of Medicine

Do you have questions relating to your research or analysis? We’re here to help! This session will provide an opportunity for research-related speed-dating with Biostatistics, Epidemiology, and Research Design (BERD) experts from CTSAs around the nation. The goal is for investigators at all levels to come with a research issue in mind. After brief introductions, investigators will meet with BERD experts 1:1 for back-of-the-napkin style research guidance. For best results, we suggest bringing a couple of questions or a complex multi-faceted problem. Our goal is to help you get your research moving!

  • Designing Successful Online Programs: Goals, Challenges, Lessons Learned
  • Innovative Products for Curriculum Design
  • Partnerships to Advance Training in Translational and Regulatory Science
  • Education Administrators Networking Session

Health Equity and Community Engagement

Biostatistical Education to Increase Research Innovation and Diversity in Academic Medicine
Presented by Emilia Bagiella, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai; Melissa D. Begg, Columbia University

Increasing recruitment, retention, promotion, and research innovation of diverse leaders in the clinical investigator workforce, inclusive of both clinicians and non-clinicians, requires comprehensive, multilevel solutions. One mechanism by which academic medical institutions can better ensure the success of underrepresented minorities (URMs) is by providing them with unique opportunities to simultaneously increase their statistical competency and research capacity. In this panel discussion, two leaders in the field of biostatistics, who have extensive experience in the development and implementation of methodological training programs targeted to URMs at various stages in their careers will share their experiences with regards to the development, implementation, and evaluation of such programs.

Broadly Engaged Team Science: Guidelines for Research Institutions for Stakeholder Engagement
Presented by Consuelo H. Wilkins, Meharry-Vanderbilt Alliance; Joe V. Selby Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute

It is increasingly apparent that true team science not only requires the active participation of a range of disciplines and roles, but to be relevant and impactful, these teams must include stakeholders from outside the academic research enterprise, such as patients, communities, and not-for- and for-profit organizations.  We term this “broadly engaged team science.”  This session will address how, in our research institutions, we promote clinical research processes with a proposed model of broadly engaged team science.  An objective of this session will be to generate a list of recommendations and steps that could be useful to the national clinical research enterprise around stakeholder engagement as broadly engaged team science.

Community-Based Solutions to Achieving Health Equity at the Local Level
Presented by Sergio Aguilar-Gaxiola, MD, PhD, University of California Davis; Nancy M. Bennett, MD, MS, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry

This session will provide an overview of community-engaged research (CEnR), a widely used approach in which communities and researchers effectively collaborate to address and reduce health/mental health care disparities.  Two examples of how CEnR is being translated into services in a way that addresses the unmet health/mental health needs of underserved populations at the local level will be presented.  The session will conclude with a demonstration from two local examples of how researchers and communities are coming together to build meaningful partnerships and organize to jointly make decisions and achieve transformative action for improving community health and achieving health equity.

Eliminating Disparities to Improve Health Outcomes: Case Studies in Optimal Experiences Illustrating Reduction of Science to Practice
Presented by Barbara Segarra Vazquez, Dean, School of Health Professions, University of Puerto Rico; Mona Fouad, University of Alabama; Electra Paskett, Ohio State University

The panel will present a range of promising social and behavioral interventions, highlighting issues of timing, sensitive periods, and sequencing of interventions that may matter to effect decrease in health disparities. The session aims to address strategies to improve health and reduce disparities that may have the greatest impact.

Engagement in Precision Medicine and Genomics Research
Presented by Karen E. Kim, University of Chicago; Elizabeth G. Cohn, Columbia University

Precision medicine and genomics research will advance the understanding of disease and bring a new era of medicine that takes into account individual variability. To fully realize the promise of precision medicine, researchers must meaningfully engage individuals and communities with varying backgrounds, resources, cultural beliefs, and levels of trust. Speakers in this session will discuss approaches to engaging diverse communities in research, opportunities to advance the science of engagement in large-scale studies, and strategies to address barriers to engagement.

Engaging Stakeholders in Early Translational Research
Presented by Rhonda Kost, The Rockefeller University Center for Clinical and Translational Science; Jonathan N. Tobin, PhD Clinical Directors Network, Inc., Rockefeller University CTSA

Community-engaged research is increasingly important across the spectrum of translational research and its prominence was further fueled by a 2013 Institute of Medicine report, which recommended communities be involved in all phases of research. Effective methods of engagement can enhance study design, increase public trust, increase participation, and improve uptake of research findings. Despite its potential benefits, community engagement is rarely implemented in early translational research and innovative approaches are needed to facilitate engagement. In this session, speakers will discuss novel strategies to engaging community members in basic and early translational research and opportunities to fully integrate the public in the earliest translational phases.

PCORI Grants: Evolving Engagement Policies to Improve Patient-centered Research
Presented by Carrie Wolinetz, PhD, Associate Director, Office of Science Policy, Justin E. Bekelman, MD University of Pennsylvania

Patient-centered research is important to identify and study outcomes that make a difference to patients and their caregivers. However, patient-centered research is not understood by many in the larger research community. Clinical scientists may know of the PCORI group, but they may not understand what it entails and policy factors important to patient-centered research. This session aims to discuss patient-centered research from a practical and policy perspective to demystify this important topic.

Patient-Centered Outcomes Research

PCORI Grants: Evolving Engagement Policies to Improve Patient-centered Research
Presented by Carrie Wolinetz, PhD, Associate Director, Office of Science Policy, Justin E. Bekelman, MD University of Pennsylvania

Patient-centered research is important to identify and study outcomes that make a difference to patients and their caregivers. However, patient-centered research is not understood by many in the larger research community. Clinical scientists may know of the PCORI group, but they may not understand what it entails and policy factors important to patient-centered research. This session aims to discuss patient-centered research from a practical and policy perspective to demystify this important topic.

Regulatory Science and Translational Methods

CTSA One Health Alliance: Advancing Therapy through Translational Teams of Health Professionals
Presented by Lisa Freeman, Tufts University; Duncan Lascelles, North Carolina State University; Cheryl London, Tufts University

One Health is a collaborative and interdisciplinary approach to optimizing health for humans and animals. The mission of the CTSA One Health Alliance is to advance our understanding of diseases shared by humans and animals, such as cancer, heart disease, arthritis, and obesity. Conducting clinical trials in these natural animal models provides an innovative and effective approach for accelerating translational research that can ultimately benefit both humans and animals. 

Key Considerations in Design and Analysis of ‘OMICS Based Studies
Presented by Daniel Gaile, PhD, Department of Biostatistics, University at Buffalo; Heidi Spratt, PhD, Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health, University of Texas Medical Branch

This session will address many of the practical issues associated with the successful design and implementation of an ‘OMICS based study. After attending the session, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the appropriate types of  personnel (e.g., Biostatistician, Bioinformaticist, Computer Scientist, “Data Analyst”) to recruit to their investigative team and how to best coordinate their roles. 
  • Identify considerations pertaining to experimental design which  will improve the power, relevance, and reproducibility  of their proposed studies. 
  • Recognize data analytic challenges that are frequently encountered in ‘OMICS based studies and understand some of the prospective (i.e., design stage) and retrospective (e.g., ‘normalization’ ) methods for correction. 

Partnerships to Advance Training in Translational and Regulatory Science
Presented by ShaAvhrée Buckman-Garner, Food and Drug Administration; Robert J. Meyer, University of Virginia

Regulatory Science is often defined as the science of developing new tools, standards, and approaches to assess the safety, efficacy, quality, and performance of regulated products.  Translational Science and Regulatory Science have a shared goal and promise to advance medical product development and ultimately improve public health.  Progress in this area requires collaborative multi-disciplinary training approaches that engage diverse partners.  This session will explore training needs, initiatives and career pathways that integrate translational science and regulatory science, including the role for partnerships between academia, industry and government.

Recognizing Data Reproducibility as Critical for Translational Science
Presented by Rebecca Davies, University of Minnesota; Patricia A. Valdez, National Institutes of Health

Research funding agencies, industry and academic institutions have placed increased attention to the issue of ensuring research methods and results are reproducible. Irreproducible data poses a danger to the fundamental mission and promise of translational science, and data reproducibility should be considered as integral to the translational research process.  This session will present approaches, tools and best practices to integrate data reproducibility and rigor into translational research programs.  Additionally, key federal policies and initiatives impacting data quality and rigor will be discussed.

Research on a Napkin: Feedback on Design and Statistical Issues
Presented by Felicity Enders, PhD, MPH, Mayo Clinic; Emma K. Benn, DrPH, MPH, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai; Richard Holubkov, PhD, University of Utah School of Medicine

Do you have questions relating to your research or analysis? We’re here to help! This session will provide an opportunity for research-related speed-dating with Biostatistics, Epidemiology, and Research Design (BERD) experts from CTSAs around the nation. The goal is for investigators at all levels to come with a research issue in mind. After brief introductions, investigators will meet with BERD experts 1:1 for back-of-the-napkin style research guidance. For best results, we suggest bringing a couple of questions or a complex multi-faceted problem. Our goal is to help you get your research moving!

The “Why, What, and How” of Bayesian Approaches in the Analysis of Translational Data
Presented by Edward J. Bedrick, The University of Arizona; Nichole E. Carlson, University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus

Tools to Apply Novel Methods for the Design and Analysis of Clinical Trials
Presented by Kelley Kidwell, University of Michigan; Michael Rosenblum, Johns Hopkins University; David Kent, Tufts Medical Center

In recent years, there have been major innovations in the design and analysis of clinical trials, including (1) sequential, multiple assignment randomized trial (SMART) design, (2) leveraging baseline covariates to improve the efficiency of randomized trials and (3) heterogeneity of treatment effects. In this session, we will introduce the methods, explain why and when one should consider using them and present information about software tools and resources that are being developed to facilitate their use.  This session is targeted at clinical investigators and their statistical collaborators.

Use of Electronic Health Records in Clinical Research
Presented by Paul A. Harris, PhD, Professor of Biomedical Informatics Department of Biomedical Informatics, Vanderbilt University; Brian J. Wells, MD/PhD, Associate Professor Translational Science Inst., Wake Forest School of Medicine; Walter T. Ambrosius, PhD, Professor and Chair Dept. of Biostatistical Sci., Wake Forest School of Medicine

The use of Electronic Health Record data to conduct clinical research has greatly increased due to national emphasis areas such as comparative effectiveness research and initiatives such as the Health Information Technology Act (HITECH) which included incentives for the “meaningful use” of EHRs.  In this presentation, we focus on key technical, regulatory, and statistical considerations when using the EHR for clinical research.  Key technical considerations include:

  • identifying research participants
  • expanding data collection
  • integration of data from multiple sources
  • standardizing data
  • evaluating the quality of integrated data.  

Key statistical considerations include

  • bias considerations in sample selection
  • measurement and misclassification issues
  • missing data
  • effect size vs statistical significance in large studies.

Team Science

Innovations in Academic-Industry Partnerships
Presented by Aoy Tomita-Mitchell, Medical College of Wisconsin

Given the over-arching goal of translational science is to translate scientific discovery into patient centered applications, hear an expert academic scientist discuss one pathway that led to a successful academic-industry partnership and learn potential ways to build partnerships.

Translational Science, Policy and Health Outcomes Science

Advancing T3 Implementation Science through CTSAs
Presented by Paul Meissner, MSPH, Montefiore Medical Center, The University Hospital for Albert Einstein College of Medicine; Patricia Jones, DrPH, MPH. NIH/NCATS; Enola Proctor, PhD, MSW, Univ of Washington St Louis Brown School

The mission of the NIH CTSA program will be fully realized only with significant increase in efforts to implement research findings into care and policy.  Implementation research increases our understanding of how to facilitate healthcare professionals, healthcare delivery systems, and policy makers in rapid uptake of new evidence. This new science takes into account the dynamics that occur at the intersection of healthcare services, delivery systems, healthcare providers, patients, administrators, and consumers. At our 2017 session, the expert panel will explore the unique challenges of this nascent scientific field within the context of NIH CTSAs, including the work of the CTSA Consortium Domain Task Force on Dissemination, Implementation, and Knowledge Transfer.

Integrating Clinical and Translational Research into Clinical Care
Presented by Jeanhee A. Chung, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital; Dan Roden, Vanderblilt School of Medicine

This session will focus on performing clinical and translational research in the setting of clinical care. The session will focus on the digital divide between clinical researchers and clinicians, approaches to overcome the divide and potential areas for collaboration (e.g., recruitment, data sharing, etc.). The session will also focus on return of genetic data to the electronic medical record and its use for clinical care and research.

Recognizing Data Reproducibility as Critical for Translational Science
Presented by Rebecca Davies, University of Minnesota; Patricia A. Valdez, National Institutes of Health

Research funding agencies, industry and academic institutions have placed increased attention to the issue of ensuring research methods and results are reproducible. Irreproducible data poses a danger to the fundamental mission and promise of translational science, and data reproducibility should be considered as integral to the translational research process.  This session will present approaches, tools and best practices to integrate data reproducibility and rigor into translational research programs.  Additionally, key federal policies and initiatives impacting data quality and rigor will be discussed.

Serendipity in Science
Presented by Kevin Deane, MD, University of Colorado Denver; Barry S. Coller, MD Rockefeller University

Serendipity in Science showcases the careers and accomplishments of exceptional scientists. Through tales of success, sometimes failure, and occasional luck, listeners will glean precious advice from the wisdom these scientists have accumulated. The result is a fun session that inspires junior as well as senior scientists alike.